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Bread and Roses

Bread and Roses
Author: Bruce Watson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 144064926X
Pages: 352
Year: 2006-07-25
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On January 12, 1912, an army of textile workers stormed out of the mills in Lawrence, Massachusetts, commencing what has since become known as the "Bread and Roses" strike. Based on newspaper accounts, magazine reportage, and oral histories, Watson reconstructs a Dickensian drama involving thousands of parading strikers from fifty-one nations, unforgettable acts of cruelty, and even a protracted murder trial that tested the boundaries of free speech. A rousing look at a seminal and overlooked chapter of the past, Bread and Roses is indispensable reading.

Bread and Roses

Bread and Roses
Author: Bruce Watson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143037358
Pages: 337
Year: 2006
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An account of the 1912 textile strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts identifies the strike's key figures and events, from the walkout of 23,000 workers to the evacuations of their children to Manhattan.

Bread and Roses

Bread and Roses
Author: Bruce Watson
Publisher: Viking Press
ISBN:
Pages: 337
Year: 2005
View: 632
Read: 314

An account of the 1912 textile strike in Lawrence, Massachusetts identifies the strike's key figures and events, from the walkout of 23,000 workers to the evacuations of their children to Manhattan.

Bread and Roses, Too

Bread and Roses, Too
Author: Katherine Paterson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547488750
Pages: 288
Year: 2008-08-12
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2013 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award Rosa’s mother is singing again, for the first time since Papa died in an accident in the mills. But instead of filling their cramped tenement apartment with Italian lullabies, Mamma is out on the streets singing union songs, and Rosa is terrified that her mother and older sister, Anna, are endangering their lives by marching against the corrupt mill owners. After all, didn’t Miss Finch tell the class that the strikers are nothing but rabble-rousers—an uneducated, violent mob? Suppose Mamma and Anna are jailed or, worse, killed? What will happen to Rosa and little Ricci? When Rosa is sent to Vermont with other children to live with strangers until the strike is over, she fears she will never see her family again. Then, on the train, a boy begs her to pretend that he is her brother. Alone and far from home, she agrees to protect him . . . even though she suspects that he is hiding some terrible secret. From a beloved, award-winning author, here is a moving story based on real events surrounding an infamous 1912 strike.

Lawrence and the 1912 Bread and Roses Strike

Lawrence and the 1912 Bread and Roses Strike
Author: Robert Forrant, Susan Grabski
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439643849
Pages: 128
Year: 2013-08-26
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Incorporated in 1847 on the banks of the Merrimack River, Lawrence, Massachusetts, was the final and most ambitious of New England’s planned textile-manufacturing cities developed by the Boston-area entrepreneurs who helped launch the American Industrial Revolution. With a dam and canal system to generate power, by 1912 Lawrence led the world in the production of worsted wool cloth. The Pacific Cotton Mills alone had sales of nearly $10 million and had mechanical equipment capable of producing 800 miles of finished textile fabrics every working day. However, industrial growth was accompanied by worsening health, housing, and working conditions for most of the city’s workers. These were the root causes that led to the long, sometimes violent struggle between people of diverse ethnic groups and languages and the city’s mill owners and overseers. The 1912 strike—known today as the Bread and Roses Strike—became a landmark moment in history.

Radicals of the Worst Sort

Radicals of the Worst Sort
Author: Ardis Cameron
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 025206318X
Pages: 256
Year: 1995-01-01
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Focusing on the textile workers' strikes of 1882 and 1912, Ardis Cameron examines class and gender formation as drawn from the experiences of working-class women in the textile manufacturing town of Lawrence, Massachusetts. She explores the role of women in worker militancy from the perspective of the neighborhood and argues for the importance of female networks and associational life in working-class culture and politics. Radicals of the Worst Sort is a study of domination and power, constructed not only at the level of economics and politics but also at the level of social perception and conceptualization. It thus provides the basis for a new set of generalizations about the lives of nineteenth-century factory women in their jobs and communities. This exciting history illuminates ongoing debates about the dynamic role of gender and challenges shifting perceptions and definitions of what a "woman" should be. Cameron shows that unionized women who fought for equality were "radicals of the worst sort" (as one mill officer tagged them) because they rebelled against traditional economic and sexual hierarchies, providing alternative models for turn-of-the-century women. Radicals of the Worst Sort includes oral histories of former strikers in the famous Bread and Roses strike of 1912. Four full-color maps show Cameron's meticulous documentation of the nationalities of every Lawrence family living in the multicultural neighborhoods featured in her book.

Disaster in Lawrence

Disaster in Lawrence
Author: Alvin F. Oickle
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1614234868
Pages: 128
Year: 2008-06-27
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The destruction was unimaginable. Workers in nearby factories watched with horror as the Pemberton Mill buckled and then collapsed, trapping more than six hundred workers, many of them women and children. Word of the disaster spread quickly and volunteers rushed to the scene. As survivors called out for help, a lantern fell, and within minutes fire engulfed the building, burning those trapped inside. It took days for rescuers to complete the grim task of removing the charred bodies of the dead. Alvin F. Oickle's riveting account illustrates why, nearly a century and a half later, the Pemberton collapse is still considered one of the worst industrial calamities in American history.

Immigrant City

Immigrant City
Author: Donald B. Cole
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469640163
Pages: 248
Year: 2017-10-10
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The violence and radicalism connected with the Industrial Workers of the World textile strike of 1912 in Lawrence, Massachusetts, left the popular impression that Lawrence was a slum-ridden city inhabited by un-American revolutionaries. Immigrant City is a study of Lawrence which reveals that the city was far different. The book opens with an account of the strike of 1912. It then traces the development of Lawrence from the founding of the city in 1845, when its builders hoped to establish a model mill town, through its years of immigration and growth of 1912. Donald Cole puts the strike in its proper perspective by examining the history of the city, and he emphasizes the immigrant's constant search for security and explores the very important question of whether the immigrant, from his own point of view, found security. The population of Lawrence was almost completely immigrant in nature; in 1910, 90 per cent of its people were either first or second generation Americans, and they represented nearly every nation in the world. The period covered by the book--1845 through 1921--is the great middle period of American immigration, which began with the Irish Famine and ended with the Quota Law of 1921. While Immigrant City concentrates on one American city, it reveals much about American immigration in general and demonstrates clearly that, in spite of the poverty that most immigrants fought, life for the foreign-born in America was not as grim as some writers have suggested.

Rethinking the American Labor Movement

Rethinking the American Labor Movement
Author: Elizabeth Faue
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136175504
Pages: 246
Year: 2017-04-28
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Rethinking the American Labor Movement tells the story of the various groups and incidents that make up what we think of as the "labor movement." While the efforts of the American labor force towards greater wealth parity have been rife with contention, the struggle has embraced a broad vision of a more equitable distribution of the nation’s wealth and a desire for workers to have greater control over their own lives. In this succinct and authoritative volume, Elizabeth Faue reconsiders the varied strains of the labor movement, situating them within the context of rapidly transforming twentieth-century American society to show how these efforts have formed a political and social movement that has shaped the trajectory of American life. Rethinking the American Labor Movement is indispensable reading for scholars and students interested in American labor in the twentieth century and in the interplay between labor, wealth, and power.

Steel

Steel
Author: Brooke C. Stoddard
Publisher: Zenith Press
ISBN: 0760347425
Pages: 304
Year: 2015-07-07
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What is steel? How does it work? Why has it been so important? Who are the people who make it? How do they make it? Steel: From Mine to Mill, the Metal that Made America answers these questions. Improperly understood until about 150 years ago and available until then only in small quantities, the metal itself is a delicate dance of iron crystals interspersed with carbon and, depending on intended service, other elements such as nickel, chromium, and molybdenum. Once deciphered, steel began to flow from hearths in increasing amounts for the building of railroads, steel ships, skyscrapers, and bridges, in the process raising to world economic dominance Great Britain, Germany, the United States, Japan, and the Soviet Union.

Light

Light
Author: Bruce Watson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 162040561X
Pages: 304
Year: 2016-02-02
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Light begins at Stonehenge, where crowds cheer a solstice sunrise. After sampling myths explaining First Light, the story moves on to early philosophers' queries, then through the centuries, from Buddhist temples to Biblical scripture, when light was the soul of the divine. Battling darkness and despair, Gothic architects crafted radiant cathedrals while Dante dreamed a "heaven of pure light." Later, following Leonardo's advice, Renaissance artists learned to capture light on canvas. During the Scientific Revolution, Galileo gathered light in his telescope, Descartes measured the rainbow, and Newton used prisms to solidify the science of optics. But even after Newton, light was an enigma. Particle or wave? Did it flow through an invisible "ether"? Through the age of Edison and into the age of lasers, Light reveals how light sparked new wonders--relativity, quantum electrodynamics, fiber optics, and more. Although lasers now perform everyday miracles, light retains its eternal allure. "For the rest of my life," Einstein said, "I will reflect on what light is." Light explores and celebrates such curiosity.

Iron in her soul

Iron in her soul
Author: Helen C. Camp
Publisher: Washington State Univ Pr
ISBN:
Pages: 396
Year: 1995-03-01
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Flynn was a labor organizer, the only woman leader of the Industrial Workers of the World, a founding member of ACLU, and a leader of the American Communist Party.

Sitting Bull and the Paradox of Lakota Nationhood

Sitting Bull and the Paradox of Lakota Nationhood
Author: Gary Clayton Anderson
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Longman
ISBN: 0321421922
Pages: 208
Year: 2007
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In this biography, Gary Anderson chronicles of life of the renowned victor of the Battle of Little Big Horn, legendary Lakota Chief Sitting Bull. For many decades, historians have chalked up the results of Little Big Horn to Colonel's Custer's faulty strategy of attack, and remember Sitting Bull as the lame duck leader who triumphed only because of Custer's mishap. Gary Clayton Anderson, in this riveting biography, reveals a new interpretation of this crucial conflict on the high plains. The titles in the Library of American Biography Series make ideal supplements for American History Survey courses or other courses in American history where figures in history are explored. Paperback, brief, and inexpensive, each interpretive biography in this series focuses on a figure whose actions and ideas significantly influenced the course of American history and national life. In addition, each biography relates the life of its subject to the broader themes and developments of the times.

Sacco and Vanzetti

Sacco and Vanzetti
Author: Bruce Watson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0670063533
Pages: 433
Year: 2007
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Documents the infamous 1927 trial and execution of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, from the anarchist bombings in Washington, D.C., for which they may have been wrongfully convicted to the fierce public debates that have subsequently occurred as a result of the case.

Constant Turmoil

Constant Turmoil
Author: Mary H. Blewett
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 1558492399
Pages: 521
Year: 2000-01-01
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PART NARRATIVE, part analysis, this book reconstructs the complex history of the southeastern New England textile industry during the nineteenth century. Mary H. Blewett takes a fresh look at the process of industrialization from the point of view of management as well as labor and reinterprets the struggle between the two in terms of class, culture, and power. Highlighting the role of contingency and human agency in the shaping of historical events, she traces the efforts of the legendary Borden family and their allies not only to build their own private empire but to dominate the national market in print cloth. At the same time, she examines the shifting fortunes of a labor force striving to accommodate newly arrived immigrants, adapt to new technologies, and contest the control of the mill owners. Blewett has been a pioneer in analyzing the role of gender in industrialization, and this book carries that work forward. She shows how changing meanings of manhood and womanhood, nationality and race altered the course of American labor politics, as immigrant workers from Lancashire, Yorkshire, and Quebec brought their own political and cultural traditions into the New England mills. What emerges is a richly textured tale involving business scoundrels, high-minded reformers, radical agitators, sober-minded accommodationists, and assertive women activists -- all engaged in a dynamic political struggle to control the destiny of an industry that would not survive the next century.

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