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Counter Culture

Counter Culture
Author: David Platt
Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.
ISBN: 1496425855
Pages: 320
Year: 2017-02-07
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Welcome to the front lines. Everywhere we turn, battle lines are being drawn—traditional marriage vs. gay marriage, pro-life vs. pro-choice, personal freedom vs. governmental protection. Seemingly overnight, culture has shifted to the point where right and wrong are no longer measured by universal truth but by popular opinion. And as difficult conversations about homosexuality, abortion, and religious liberty continue to inject themselves into our workplaces, our churches, our schools, and our homes, Christians everywhere are asking the same question: How are we supposed to respond to all this? In Counter Culture, New York Times bestselling author David Platt shows Christians how to actively take a stand on such issues as poverty, sex trafficking, marriage, abortion, racism, and religious liberty—and challenges us to become passionate, unwavering voices for Christ. Drawing on compelling personal accounts from around the world, Platt presents an unapologetic yet winsome call for Christians to faithfully follow Christ into the cultural battlefield in ways that will prove both costly and rewarding. The lines have been drawn. The moment has come for Christians to rise up and deliver a gospel message that’s more radical than even the most controversial issues of our day.

From Counterculture to Cyberculture

From Counterculture to Cyberculture
Author: Fred Turner
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226817431
Pages: 354
Year: 2010-10-15
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In the early 1960s, computers haunted the American popular imagination. Bleak tools of the cold war, they embodied the rigid organization and mechanical conformity that made the military-industrial complex possible. But by the 1990s—and the dawn of the Internet—computers started to represent a very different kind of world: a collaborative and digital utopia modeled on the communal ideals of the hippies who so vehemently rebelled against the cold war establishment in the first place. From Counterculture to Cyberculture is the first book to explore this extraordinary and ironic transformation. Fred Turner here traces the previously untold story of a highly influential group of San Francisco Bay–area entrepreneurs: Stewart Brand and the Whole Earth network. Between 1968 and 1998, via such familiar venues as the National Book Award–winning Whole Earth Catalog, the computer conferencing system known as WELL, and, ultimately, the launch of the wildly successful Wired magazine, Brand and his colleagues brokered a long-running collaboration between San Francisco flower power and the emerging technological hub of Silicon Valley. Thanks to their vision, counterculturalists and technologists alike joined together to reimagine computers as tools for personal liberation, the building of virtual and decidedly alternative communities, and the exploration of bold new social frontiers. Shedding new light on how our networked culture came to be, this fascinating book reminds us that the distance between the Grateful Dead and Google, between Ken Kesey and the computer itself, is not as great as we might think.

Counter Culture

Counter Culture
Author: Candacy A. Taylor
Publisher: Ilr Press
ISBN: 080147440X
Pages: 142
Year: 2009
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A must-have for anyone who loves diners and coffee shops. Taylor travels more than 26,000 miles throughout the United States collecting stories of lifer waitresses. Their compelling stories are complemented by Taylor's striking color photographs of them at work.

A Compassionate Call to Counter Culture in a World of Poverty

A Compassionate Call to Counter Culture in a World of Poverty
Author: David Platt
Publisher: NavPress
ISBN: 1496405161
Pages: 64
Year: 2015-02-01
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Are you ready to take a stand against poverty and counter culture? In this companion piece to his bestselling book Counter Culture, David Platt offers sound Biblical support and practical action steps to help Christians take a courageous and compassionate stand against poverty. Drawing heavily on personal stories and Scripture, Platt encourages Christians to get involved and highlights a wide variety of ministries and organizations currently countering poverty that need your help. The stage is set for the God of the universe to do the unthinkable, the unimaginable, the shocking, and the scandalous. And He wants you to be a part of it. It’s time to take a stand for Christ, join the fight against poverty, and counter culture!

Refried Elvis

Refried Elvis
Author: Eric Zolov
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520215141
Pages: 349
Year: 1999
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From the arrival of Elvis in Mexico during the 1950s to the emergence of a full-blown counterculture movement by the late 1960s and into the 70s, Zolov uses rock to illuminate Mexican history. Zolov shows rock music as a commodity, with influences shaped by intellectuals, the state, and transnational capital as well as musicians and fans. It's a study of the political uses of culture in an authoritarian state.

Nation of Rebels

Nation of Rebels
Author: Joseph Heath, Andrew Potter
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 006074586X
Pages: 368
Year: 2004-12-14
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In this wide-ranging and perceptive work of cultural criticism, Joseph Heath and Andrew Potter shatter the most important myth that dominates much of radical political, economic, and cultural thinking. The idea of a counterculture -- a world outside of the consumer-dominated world that encompasses us -- pervades everything from the antiglobalization movement to feminism and environmentalism. And the idea that mocking or simply hoping the "system" will collapse, the authors argue, is not only counterproductive but has helped to create the very consumer society radicals oppose. In a lively blend of pop culture, history, and philosophical analysis, Heath and Potter offer a startlingly clear picture of what a concern for social justice might look like without the confusion of the counterculture obsession with being different.

Lisa's Counter Culture

Lisa's Counter Culture
Author: Lisa Herndon
Publisher:
ISBN: 0985840803
Pages:
Year: 2012-09-01
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A gluten free cookbook focused on nutrient dense foods with an emphasis on probiotic recipes

Counter Cultures

Counter Cultures
Author: Susan Porter Benson
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 025206013X
Pages: 322
Year: 1987-12-01
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What the Dormouse Said

What the Dormouse Said
Author: John Markoff
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101201088
Pages: 336
Year: 2005-04-21
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Most histories of the personal computer industry focus on technology or business. John Markoff’s landmark book is about the culture and consciousness behind the first PCs—the culture being counter– and the consciousness expanded, sometimes chemically. It’s a brilliant evocation of Stanford, California, in the 1960s and ’70s, where a group of visionaries set out to turn computers into a means for freeing minds and information. In these pages one encounters Ken Kesey and the phone hacker Cap’n Crunch, est and LSD, The Whole Earth Catalog and the Homebrew Computer Lab. What the Dormouse Said is a poignant, funny, and inspiring book by one of the smartest technology writers around.

Selling Yoga

Selling Yoga
Author: Andrea R. Jain
Publisher: OUP Us
ISBN: 019939024X
Pages: 240
Year: 2014-12-01
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Premodern and early modern yoga comprise techniques with a wide range of aims, from turning inward in quest of the true self, to turning outward for divine union, to channeling bodily energy in pursuit of sexual pleasure. Early modern yoga also encompassed countercultural beliefs and practices. In contrast, today, modern yoga aims at the enhancement of the mind-body complex but does so according to contemporary dominant metaphysical, health, and fitness paradigms. Consequently, yoga is now a part of popular culture. In Selling Yoga, Andrea R. Jain explores the popularization of yoga in the context of late-twentieth-century consumer culture. She departs from conventional approaches by undermining essentialist definitions of yoga as well as assumptions that yoga underwent a linear trajectory of increasing popularization. While some studies trivialize popularized yoga systems by reducing them to the mere commodification or corruption of what is perceived as an otherwise fixed, authentic system, Jain suggests that this dichotomy oversimplifies the history of yoga as well as its meanings for contemporary practitioners. By discussing a wide array of modern yoga types, from Iyengar Yoga to Bikram Yoga, Jain argues that popularized yoga cannot be dismissed--that it has a variety of religious meanings and functions. Yoga brands destabilize the basic utility of yoga commodities and assign to them new meanings that represent the fulfillment of self-developmental needs often deemed sacred in contemporary consumer culture.

Wild Child

Wild Child
Author: Chelsea Cain
Publisher: Fusion Press
ISBN: 1901250687
Pages: 203
Year: 2000
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Tofu casserole, communes, anti-war protests. these are just a few of the hallmarks of a hippie childhood. What became of the children who were denied meat, exposed to free love and given nouns instead of names?

Coming to My Senses

Coming to My Senses
Author: Alice Waters
Publisher: Clarkson Potter
ISBN: 1101906650
Pages: 320
Year: 2017-09-05
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The long-awaited memoir from cultural icon and culinary standard bearer Alice Waters recalls the circuitous road and tumultuous times leading to the opening of what is arguably America's most influential restaurant. When Alice Waters opened the doors of her "little French restaurant" in Berkeley, California in 1971 at the age of 27, no one ever anticipated the indelible mark it would leave on the culinary landscape—Alice least of all. Fueled in equal parts by naiveté and a relentless pursuit of beauty and pure flavor, she turned her passion project into an iconic institution that redefined American cuisine for generations of chefs and food lovers. In Coming to My Senses Alice retraces the events that led her to 1517 Shattuck Avenue and the tumultuous times that emboldened her to find her own voice as a cook when the prevailing food culture was embracing convenience and uniformity. Moving from a repressive suburban upbringing to Berkeley in 1964 at the height of the Free Speech Movement and campus unrest, she was drawn into a bohemian circle of charismatic figures whose views on design, politics, film, and food would ultimately inform the unique culture on which Chez Panisse was founded. Dotted with stories, recipes, photographs, and letters, Coming to My Senses is at once deeply personal and modestly understated, a quietly revealing look at one woman's evolution from a rebellious yet impressionable follower to a respected activist who effects social and political change on a global level through the common bond of food.

The Culture of Counter-culture

The Culture of Counter-culture
Author: Alan Watts
Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
ISBN:
Pages: 105
Year: 1998
View: 464
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A collection of lectures presented during the 1960s explores the roots of the American counter-cultural movement.

Appetite for Change

Appetite for Change
Author: Warren J. Belasco
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801471273
Pages: 336
Year: 2014-01-21
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In this engaging inquiry, originally published in 1989 and now fully updated for the twenty-first century, Warren J. Belasco considers the rise of the "countercuisine" in the 1960s, the subsequent success of mainstream businesses in turning granola, herbal tea, and other "revolutionary" foodstuffs into profitable products; the popularity of vegetarian and vegan diets; and the increasing availability of organic foods. From reviews of the previous edition: "Although Red Zinger never became our national drink, food and eating changed in America as a result of the social revolution of the 1960s. According to Warren Belasco, there was political ferment at the dinner table as well as in the streets. In this lively and intelligent mixture of narrative history and cultural analysis, Belasco argues that middle-class America eats differently today than in the 1950 because of the way the counterculture raised the national consciousness about food."—Joan Jacobs Brumberg, The Nation "This book documents not only how cultural rebels created a new set of foodways, brown rice and all, but also how American capitalists commercialized these innovations to their own economic advantage. Along the way, the author discusses the significant relationship between the rise of a 'countercuisine' and feminism, environmentalism, organic agriculture, health consciousness, the popularity of ethnic cuisine, radical economic theory, granola bars, and Natural Lite Beer. Never has history been such a good read!"—The Digest: A Review for the Interdisciplinary Study of Food "Now comes an examination of . . . the sweeping change in American eating habits ushered in by hippiedom in rebellion against middle-class America. . . . Appetite for Change tells how the food industry co-opted the health-food craze, discussing such hip capitalists as the founder of Celestial Seasonings teas; the rise of health-food cookbooks; how ethnic cuisine came to enjoy new popularity; and how watchdog agencies like the FDA served, arguably, more often as sleeping dogs than as vigilant ones."—Publishers Weekly "A challenging and sparkling book. . . . In Belasco's analysis, the ideology of an alternative cuisine was the most radical thrust of the entire counterculture and the one carrying the most realistic and urgently necessary blueprint for structural social change."—Food and Foodways "Here is meat, or perhaps miso, for those who want an overview of the social and economic forces behind the changes in our food supply. . . . This is a thought-provoking and pioneering examination of recent events that are still very much part of the present."—Tufts University Diet and Nutrition Letter

Counterculture Green

Counterculture Green
Author: Andrew G. Kirk
Publisher: Goodman Publishers
ISBN:
Pages: 303
Year: 2007
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For many, it was more than a publication: it was a way of life. The Whole Earth Catalog billed itself as "Access to Tools, " and it grew from a Bay Area blip to a national phenomenon catering to hippies, do-it-yourselfers, and anyone interested in self-sufficiency independent of mainstream America (now known as "living off the grid"). In recovering the history of the Catalog's unique brand of environmentalism, historian Kirk recounts how Stewart Brand and the Point Foundation promoted a philosophy of pragmatic environmentalism that celebrated technological achievement, human ingenuity, and sustainable living. Kirk shows us that Whole Earth was more than a mere counterculture fad. At a time when many of these ideas were seen as heretical to a predominantly wilderness-based movement, it became a critical forum for environmental alternatives and a model for how complicated ecological ideas could be presented in a hopeful and even humorous way.--From publisher description.

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